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The Pan-Canadian Healthy Living Strategy

Strengthened Pan-Canadian Healthy Living Strategy Framework - 2010

Description:

This figure is a pictorial description of the key components of the Pan-Canadian Healthy Living Strategy. This represents an update and revision to the Pan-Canadian Healthy Living Strategy Framework developed in 2005. The vision is a healthy nation in which all Canadians experience the conditions that support the attainment of good health. The twin goals are to improve overall health outcomes and to reduce disparities in health among Canadians.

The figure makes clear the need to take a population health approach by focusing on the determinants of health; explicitly addressing health disparities; focusing on target settings and key groups; and taking intersectoral action. The four Guiding Principles give priority to promotion and prevention, vertical and horizontal integration, partnerships and shared responsibility, and evidence-informed practice.

The following four sectors are identified as key:

  1. Health sector, for example, public health, clinical prevention, and chronic disease management.
  2. Social sector, for example, education, training, housing and social supports. 
  3. Environment sector, for example land use planning, sustainable environmental management and recreation.
    And
  4. Economic sectors, for example industry, employment, transportation and finance.

Strategies for moving forward include leadership and policy development, knowledge development and exchange, community development and public information.

Finally, the figure shows there are a number of current priorities to build on including physical activity, healthy eating, tobacco control, healthy weights, alcohol mis-use, and conditions (cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, obesity and chronic lung disease).  In addition, the figure points to three new areas of opportunity, i.e., mental health promotion, injury prevention and promoting healthy weights. Musculo-skeletal disorders, which as a category has the largest economic burden of disease in Canada, has been identified as an emerging area for development.

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