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Egypt

September 2014

Related Travel Health Notices

Consult a health care provider or visit a travel health clinic preferably six weeks before you travel.

Vaccines

Routine Vaccines

Be sure that your routine vaccines are up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Vaccines to Consider

You may be at risk for these vaccine-preventable diseases while travelling in this country. Talk to your travel health provider about which ones are right for you.

Hepatitis A

Hepatitis AExternal link is a disease of the liver spread through contaminated food and water or contact with an infected person. All those travelling to regions with a risk of hepatitis A infection should get vaccinated.

Hepatitis B

Hepatitis BExternal link is a disease of the liver spread through blood or other bodily fluids. Travellers who may be exposed (e.g., through sexual contact, medical treatment, sharing needles, tattooing, acupuncture or occupational exposure) should get vaccinated.

Influenza

Seasonal influenzaExternal link occurs worldwide. The flu season usually runs from November to April in the northern hemisphere, between April and October in the southern hemisphere and year round in the tropics. Influenza (flu) is caused by a virus spread from person to person when they cough or sneeze or by touching objects and surfaces that have been contaminated with the virus. Get the flu shot.

Measles

MeaslesExternal link is a highly contagious viral disease and is common in most parts of the world. Be sure your measles vaccination is up-to-date regardless of your travel destination.

Polio

There is a risk of polioExternal link in this country. Be sure that your vaccination against polio is up-to-date.

Rabies

RabiesExternal link is a deadly illness spread to humans through a bite, scratch or lick from an infected animal. Vaccination should be considered for travellers going to areas where rabies exists and who have a high risk of exposure (i.e., close contact with animals, occupational risk, and children).

Yellow Fever Vaccination

Yellow fever is a disease caused by a flavivirus from the bite of an infected mosquito.

Travellers get vaccinated either because it is required to enter a country or because it is recommended for their protection.

* It is important to note that country entry requirementsExternal link may not reflect your risk of yellow fever at your destination. It is recommended that you contact the nearest diplomatic or consular officeExternal link of the destination(s) you will be visiting to verify any additional entry requirements.
Risk
  • There is no risk of yellow fever in this country.
Country Entry Requirement*
  • Proof of vaccination is required if you are coming from or have transited through an airport of a country where yellow fever occurs.
Recommendation
  • Vaccination is not recommended.
  • Discuss travel plans, activities, and destinations with a health care provider.

Food/Water

Food and Water-borne Diseases

Travellers to any destination in the world can develop travellers’ diarrheaExternal link from consuming contaminated water or food.

In some areas in North Africa, food and water can also carry diseases like hepatitis AExternal link, schistosomiasisExternal link and typhoidExternal link. Practise safe food and water precautionsExternal link while travelling in North Africa. Remember: Boil it, cook it, peel it, or leave it!

Schistosomiasis

SchistosomiasisExternal link can be spread to humans through freshwater sources contaminated by blood flukes (tiny worms). The eggs of the worms can cause stomach illnesses like diarrhea and cramps or urinary problems. Risk is generally low for most travellers. Avoid swimming in freshwater sources (lakes, rivers, ponds). There is no vaccine available for schistosomiasis.

Travellers' diarrhea

  • Travellers' diarrheaExternal link is the most common illness affecting travellers. It is spread from eating or drinking contaminated food or water.
  • Risk of developing travellers’ diarrhea increases when travelling in regions with poor standards of hygiene and sanitation. Practise safe food and water precautions.
  • The most important treatment for travellers' diarrhea is rehydration (drinking lots of fluids). Carry oral rehydration salts when travelling.

Typhoid

TyphoidExternal link is a bacterial infection spread by contaminated food or water. Risk is higher among pediatric travellers, travellers going to rural areas, visiting friends and relatives or travelling for a long period of time. Travellers at high risk visiting regions with typhoid risk, especially those exposed to places with poor sanitation should speak to a health care provider about vaccination.

Insects

Insects and Illness

In some areas in North Africa, certain insects carry and spread diseases like Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic feverExternal link, leishmaniasisExternal link, malariaExternal link, Rift Valley feverExternal link, and West Nile virus.

Travellers are advised to take precautions against bitesExternal link.

Chikungunya

There is currently an outbreak of chikungunya in this country. ChikungunyaExternal link is a viral disease spread through the bite of an infected mosquito that typically causes fever and pain in the joints. Protect yourself from mosquito bites, particularly around sunrise and sunset. There is no vaccine available for chikungunya.

Malaria

There is no risk of malaria in this country.

Animals

Animals and Illness

Travellers are cautioned to avoid contact with animals, including dogs, monkeys, snakes, rodents, birds, and bats. Certain infections found in some areas in North Africa, like avian influenzaExternal link and rabiesExternal link, can be shared between humans and animals.

Avian Influenza

There have been human cases of avian influenza in this country. Avian influenzaExternal link is a viral infection that can spread quickly and easily among birds and in rare cases, it can infect people.

Avoid high risk areas such as poultry farms and live animal markets including areas where poultry may be slaughtered.  Avoid contact with birds (alive or dead) and surfaces that may have bird droppings or secretions on them. Ensure all poultry dishes, including eggs, are well cooked.

Person-to-Person

Person-to-Person Infections

Crowded conditions can increase your risk of certain illnesses. Remember to wash your handsExternal link often and practice proper cough and sneeze etiquette to avoid colds, the fluExternal link and other illnesses.

Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and HIVExternal link are spread through blood and bodily fluids; practise safer sex.

Keep in Mind...

The decision to travel is the sole responsibility of the traveller. The traveller is also responsible for his or her own personal safety.

Be prepared. Do not expect medical services to be the same as in Canada. Pack a travel health kitExternal link, especially if you will be travelling away from major city centres.