Public Health Agency of Canada
Symbol of the Government of Canada

Share this page

Public Health Agency of Canada
2013–14 Report on Plans and Priorities

Section II: Analysis of Program(s) by Strategic Outcome(s)

Strategic Outcome: Protecting Canadians and empowering them to improve their health

Program 1.1: Public Health Infrastructure

Description:

The Public Health Infrastructure Program strengthens Canada's public health workforce capability, information exchange, and F/P/T networks, and scientific capacity. These infrastructure elements are necessary to support effective public health practice and decision making in Canada. Working with federal, provincial and territorial stakeholders and within existing collaborative mechanisms, the Program supports planning for and building consensus on strategic and targeted investments in public health infrastructure, including training, tools, best practices, standards, and mechanisms to facilitate information exchange and coordinated action. Public health laboratories provide leadership in research, technical innovation, reference laboratory services; surveillance; outbreak response capacity; and national laboratory coordination. Through these capacity-building mechanisms and scientific expertise, the Government of Canada facilitates effective coordination and timely public health interventions which are essential to having an integrated and evidence-based national public health system. Key stakeholders include local, regional, provincial and national public health organizations, practitioners and policy makers, researchers and academics, professional associations and non-governmental organizations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
118,150,146 118,150,146 118,150,147 118,510,146
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
740 740 740
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canada has the public health system infrastructure to manage public health threats of domestic and international concern. Level of Canada's compliance with the public health capacity requirements outlined in the International Health Regulations 3 March 31, 2015
Canada is able to use highly specialized laboratory technologies to identify and characterize pathogens in support of public health surveillance and investigation of disease outbreaks. The number of pathogens for which molecular typing is offered by national laboratories 128 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under this Program will contribute to meeting the Agency's Organizational Priorities 1, 2, and 3, as well as manage related risks 1, 2, 3, and 4 as described in the Risk Analysis sub-section.

As part of this Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Continue to strengthen Canada's International Health Regulations in support of achieving capability level 3Footnote 4 by generating information, products and tools that reflect international best practices and standards; and
  • Strengthen Canada's public health laboratory capacity to detect and respond to existing and emerging threats by:
    • Participating in global efforts to detect, prevent, and control emerging pathogens, and developing vaccines and therapeutic approaches to protect the public from infectious disease threats;
    • Advancing cutting-edge development and use of bioinformatics (scientific computing) and genomics for improved pathogen detection and outbreak investigation;
    • Developing improved tools for conducting studies and surveillance of drug resistant organisms; and
    • Enhancing Canada's ability to rapidly detect and trace the origins of food hazards in Canada.

Sub-Program 1.1.1: Public Health Capacity Building

Description:

The Public Health Capacity Program contributes to the development and maintenance of a Canadian public health workforce which has the depth and capability to respond to public health issues and requirements at any time. Working with federal, provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders, the Program provides training and support to public health professionals to support this group to carry out core functions and respond effectively and cooperatively to public health events. The Program takes a leadership role in: developing strategies for public health human resources; identifying core competencies required for public health workforce; offering training for public health practitioners to be able to carry out core public health functions; strengthening national capacity to quickly respond to disease outbreaks and public health events; and providing funding to academia to strengthen and advance research and innovative methods in public health. The Program uses funding from the following transfer payment: Public Health Scholarship and Capacity Building Initiative.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
16,611,472 16,611,472 16,971,472

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
122 122 122
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canada has the public health system infrastructure to manage public health threats of domestic and international concern. Percent of PHAC field staff who say that their competencies have improved 85 March 31, 2017
Percent of public health practitioners who took PHAC training who say they are better equipped to perform public health functions 80 March 31, 2015
Percent of public health host organizations who say that PHAC field staff contributed to their capacity to respond to public health events 83 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Recruit and train field epidemiologists and public health officers to improve capacity to identify and manage public health events such as disease outbreaks and natural disasters;
  • Increase public health capacity in remote, rural and Northern regions by supporting P/T partners in a collaborative approach;
  • Develop a strategic approach to strengthening the competencies and capabilities of the Agency's public health workforce; and
  • Update surge and response systems management tools to improve the Agency's response to national public health events through the mobilization of the right people and skills.

Sub-Program 1.1.2: Public Health Information and Networks

Description:

The Public Health Information and Networks Program facilitates federal, provincial, and territorial coordination and collaboration, and establishes core structures to facilitate access to accurate and reliable information, tools and models required by Canadian public health professionals to perform their public health duties effectively. Working with federal, provincial and territorial partners through the Public Health Network, the Program provides leadership by consulting and undertaking collaborative planning for public health strategies and addressing issues affecting the sharing of information for effective surveillance and action. The Program also invests in tools and processes to allow public health practice and core public health functions to be informed by evidence and applied knowledge; develops scenarios for population and public health research, and prepares models for economic analysis to support effective decision-making. The Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Assessed Contribution to the Pan American Health Organization, National Collaborating Centres for Public Health, and Grants to eligible non-profit international organizations in support of their projects or programs on health.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
30,318,374 30,318,374 30,318,374
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
86 86 86
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Mechanisms are in place to enable public health partners to work collaboratively to address existing and emerging public health infrastructure issues Number of jurisdictions who sign the Multilateral Information Sharing Agreement on infectious diseases and public health events 4 December 31, 2014
Public health organizations are engaged and participate in collaborative networks and processes Percent of collaborative initiatives/projects delivered and/or on track based on work plans by fiscal year 70 March 31, 2015
Public health professionals and partners have access to reliable, actionable public health data and information Percent of public health professionals and partners who responded that the Chief Public Health Officer's Report on the State of Public Health in Canada was useful 75 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Finalize and operationalize the Multilateral Information Sharing Agreement (a ministerial-level agreement that sets out what public health information is to be shared between F/P/T jurisdictions and how it is to be used to inform Canadians);
  • Lead the collaborative development of a Blueprint for a Federated System for Public Health Surveillance in Canada, (a vision for health surveillance priority-setting, decision-making, management and information sharing);
  • Improve public health surveillance to monitor infectious and chronic diseases, and their risk factors, impacting Canadians;
  • Improve dissemination and access to surveillance data through channels such as Canada's Action Plan on Open Government; and
  • Publish the Chief Public Health Officer's Annual Report on the State of Public Health in Canada, highlighting specific public health issues that warrant further discussion and action in Canada.

Sub-Program 1.1.3: Public Health Laboratory Systems

Description:

The Public Health Laboratory Systems Program is a national resource providing Canada with a wide range of highly specialized scientific and laboratory expertise and access to state of the art technologies. The Program informs public health professionals at all levels of government to enable evidence-based decision making in the management of and response to diseases and their risk factors. The Program conducts public health research; uses innovative approaches to advance laboratory science; performs reference laboratory services; contributes to public health surveillance; provides outbreak response capacity; and leads national public health laboratory coordination. The Program also addresses public health risk factors arising from human, animal and environmental interactions by conducting research, surveillance and population risk analysis. These combined efforts work to inform infectious and chronic disease-specific strategies and prevention initiatives. The knowledge generated and translated by the Program supports the development and implementation of national and international public health policies, guidelines, interventions, decisions and action that contribute to the lifelong health of the population.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
71,220,300 71,220,301 71,220,300
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
532 532 532
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Decisions and interventions to protect the health of Canadians are supported by research and reference/testing services Percent of accredited reference laboratory tests that are conducted within the specific turnaround times 95 March 31, 2015
Percent of clients indicating overall satisfaction with laboratory reference services as "satisfied" or "very satisfied" 90 March 31, 2015
# of citations to agency laboratory research publication to demonstrate knowledge transfer uptake 1800 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Provide Canada's only Level 4 laboratory capacity to rapidly respond to outbreaks of infectious disease by conducting initial analyses of unknown pathogens, as well as provide timely, highly specialized laboratory services to aid in the identification of emerging and rare infectious diseases;
  • Monitor:
  • Build public health capacity in innovative testing methodology and disseminate these processes to P/T public health laboratories;
  • Support FoodNet Canada'sFootnote xxxi ability to track human illness to specific sources of contaminated food by working to prevent or predict severe food-borne illness; and
  • Work horizontally with key international partners in the U.S., U.K., and the Netherlands to develop a standardized laboratory method for typing C. difficile - a common health-care associated infection. This approach will enable more accurate monitoring and sharing of information with respect to global patterns of C. difficile circulation, provide new insights into the transmission of this disease, and reduce costs associated with existing methods of testing.

Program 1.2: Health Promotion and Disease Prevention

Description:

The Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Program aims to promote better overall health of the population-with additional focus on those that are most vulnerable-by promoting healthy development among children, adults and seniors, reducing health inequalities, and preventing and controlling chronic and infectious diseases. Working in collaboration with provinces and territories, the Program develops and implements federal aspects of frameworks and strategies (e.g., Curbing Childhood Obesity: A Federal, Provincial and Territorial Framework for Action to Promote Healthy Weights, national approaches to addressing immunization, HIV/AIDS) geared toward promoting health and preventing disease. The Program primary public health functions of health promotion, surveillance, science and research on diseases and associated risk and protective factors to inform evidenced-based frameworks, strategies, and interventions. It also undertakes health promotion and prevention initiatives working with stakeholders to prevent and mitigate chronic disease and injury, and to help prevent and control infectious disease.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014-15
Main Estimates
2014-15
Planned Spending
2015-16
Planned Spending
2016-17
Planned Spending
350,697,145 350,697,145 295,772,937 291,518,794

The planned decrease is due to the Agency's final payment of $49.7M to P/Ts under the Hepatitis C Health Care Services Program in 2014–15.

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
856 842 836
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Diseases in Canada are prevented and mitigated Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (HIV) 6.41 March 31, 2015
Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (hepatitis B) 9.17
Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (hepatitis C) 28.82
Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (tuberculosis) 3.6
Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (E. coli 0157) 1.39
Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (salmonella) 19.68
Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (invasive pneumococcal disease in children of less than one year old) 28/100,000
Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (invasive pneumococcal disease in children ages one to four years) 20/100,000
Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (pertussis deaths in the target population of less than or equal to three months of age) 0
Rates per 100,000 of key infectious diseases (invasive meningococcal disease) 0.7/100,000
Rate of key chronic disease risk factors (% of the population aged 20 and over that reports being physically active) 50.1Footnote 5 March 31, 2015
Rate of key chronic disease risk factors (% of the population of children and youth aged 5 to 17 who are overweight or obese) 31.5Footnote 6

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under this Program will contribute to meeting the Agency's Organizational Priorities 1, 2, and 3, as well as manage related risks 1, 3, 4, and 5 as described in the Risk Analysis sub-section.

As part of this Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Prevent and control persistent and emerging infectious diseases through targeted prevention initiatives including:
    • An action plan to inform future response efforts to address vector-borne disease in Canada (e.g., Lyme disease);
    • Work with federal partners to address the underlying factors for Tuberculosis; and
    • An antimicrobial resistance (AMR) awareness campaign for health practitioners, the general public, and the media to promote better understanding of appropriate antibiotic usage.
  • Continue to work with P/Ts, private, and not-for-profit sectors to support innovative multi-sectoral partnerships promoting healthy active lifestyles to mitigate and reduce the risk of developing a chronic disease.

Sub-Program 1.2.1: Infectious Disease Prevention and Control

Description:

The Infectious Disease Prevention and Control Program is the national focal point for efforts to help prevent, mitigate and control the spread and impact of infectious diseases in Canada. The Program provides leadership for integrating activities related to surveillance, laboratory science, epidemiology, research, promotion, modeling, intervention and prevention, including immunization. Applying an evidence-based approach, the Program informs targeted prevention and control initiatives for many infectious disease threats including acute respiratory and vaccine preventable infections (e.g., influenza, measles), sexually transmitted and blood borne infections (e.g., hepatitis B and C, HIV), hospital associated infections (e.g., C. difficile), and human diseases resulting from environmental exposures to food, water, animals and other vectors (e.g., Listeria, E.coli O157, West Nile virus). This Program reinforces efforts to protect the health and well-being of Canada's population, reinforces efforts to reduce the economic burden of infectious disease and provides expert advice to federal, provincial and territorial partners and stakeholders. The knowledge generated and translated by this Program influences and enables the development and implementation of public health policies, guidelines, interventions and action-including those required to meet Canada's International Health Regulations obligations-and helps to guide the population in their decisions regarding their personal health and that of their families.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
97,431,091 48,796,344 47,262,685

The planned decrease is due to the Agency's final payment of $49.7M to P/Ts under the Hepatitis C Health Care Services Program in 2014–15.

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
314 313 307
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
New emerging and re-emerging infectious disease trends are identified and responded to in a timely manner Percent of operational plans developed within six months to address new emerging and re-emerging infectious disease trends for non-outbreak situations of potentially serious consequence 75 March 31, 2015
Actively engage Canadians on infectious disease issues Percent uptake of information via social media outreach mechanisms 0.6 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Accelerate dissemination and access to surveillance data and analysis through channels such as the Open Government Initiative and other social media to support public health action on issues related to key notifiable infectious disease risks;
  • Address key public health issues in Northern Canada by:
    • Engaging partners and at-risk Aboriginal and Northern communities;
    • Developing culturally appropriate communications tools related to tuberculosis;
    • Implementing a coordinated testing and counselling campaign for sexually transmitted and blood-borne infections (STBBIs);
    • Developing immunization registries; and
    • Strengthening surveillance for vaccine-preventable diseases.
  • Develop knowledge products for public health professionals to influence behaviour and public health policies, guidelines, interventions and actions, including the revitalization of a key flagship scientific publication, the Canada Communicable Disease Report.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.1.1: Immunization

Description:

The Immunization Program reduces the burden of infectious disease and contributes to higher life expectancies for Canada's population and lower costs to the health care system by supporting vaccine accessibility in Canada. Under the framework of the National Immunization Strategy, the Immunization Program seeks to protect all of the population from vaccine preventable diseases by providing a science based approach for the use of existing and the introduction of new vaccines, encouraging maximum vaccine uptake and coverage, providing information on vaccine surveillance and safety, and ensuring a safe and affordable supply of vaccines. In this regard, the Program enables provinces and territories to access vaccines at a reduced cost through bulk purchases so a supply of vaccine is available in the event of an outbreak. The Program also supports the work of the National Advisory Committee on Immunization which provides expert advice on vaccine use for all jurisdictions in Canada.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
7,687,121 7,687,121 7,687,121
Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
35 35 35
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Constructive engagement and support of public health stakeholders Percent of population covered by functioning immunization registries 95 March 31, 2017
Elimination status of measles, rubella, congenital rubella and polio in Canada is maintained through immunization against these diseases and surveillance of importations to Canada % of WHO elimination/eradication verification criteria met 95 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Establish mechanisms and priorities to strengthen immunization research and vaccine innovation through collaboration with partners on the development of approaches for vaccine and immunization program research and evaluation; and
  • Enhance the security of vaccine supplies by developing an F/P/T risk-based, decision making approach for vaccine supply management; updating, where necessary, the annual influenza vaccine supply strategy and new influenza vaccine supply contracts to address any potential supply disruptions.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.1.2: Infectious and Communicable Diseases

Description:

The Infectious and Communicable Diseases Program supports the prevention and control of infectious diseases by monitoring emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases which are identified by the Agency as leading causes of hospitalization and death in Canada, and by developing strategic approaches to reduce the likelihood of infection. The Program monitors and reports risk factors and trends associated with infectious diseases and works collaboratively with federal, provincial, territorial, and international partners to develop national approaches to manage infectious disease threats and decrease the transmission of communicable diseases and infections (such as hospital associated infections, sexually transmitted infections, HIV/AIDS, hepatitis B and C, tuberculosis, vaccine preventable diseases and other respiratory infectious diseases). The Program also seeks to reduce the risk and incidence of infections and injuries associated with blood transfusions and organ transplantation by providing knowledge products to federal, provincial, and territorial health care experts. This Program, informed by science, uses this knowledge to prevent infectious disease outbreaks and generate guidelines, education materials, frameworks and reports to guide decision making to support public health action. These activities inform national action plans and global responses to prevent and control infectious diseases, in accordance with the International Health Regulations. The Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Federal Initiative to Address HIV and AIDS; Hep C Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
75,385,473 27,188,884 26,474,091

The planned decrease is due to the Agency's final payment of $49.7M to P/Ts under the Hepatitis C Health Care Services Program in 2014–15.

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
193 193 189
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Reduce the annual rate of active TB infections in key populations The annual rate per 100,000 of active tuberculosis cases in key populations 3.6 March 31, 2015
Up-to-date guidance information on prevention and control of infectious disease is available to provincial and territorial public health officials and other stakeholders to support policy and operational decisions Percent of emerging and re-emerging infectious disease guidance information requiring update that is updated and disseminated annually 90 March 31, 2015
Infectious disease surveillance information is available to support evidence based decision making Percent of surveillance disease reports associated with key emerging and re-emerging infectious diseases that are updated and disseminated annually 90 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Work with P/T networks towards the creation of a more efficient, all-hazards approach for outbreak/significant public health event response protocols; and
  • Provide public health leadership through collaboration with F/P/T governments, and/or technical assistance, for professionals on: vaccine-preventable diseases; AMR; tuberculosis (TB); and STBBIs; as well as evaluation/modelling related to the delivery of public health care services.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.1.3: Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases

Description:

The Food-borne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases Program seeks to reduce the risk of food-borne, water-borne, environmental and zoonotic diseases in Canada which have the potential to adversely impact the health of Canada's population. By examining the interrelationship between the environment and human health, the Program develops and disseminates measures to address the risks associated with infectious disease threats such as salmonella, E.coli 0157, West Nile virus, Legionella, and Listeria, including emerging antimicrobial resistance. The Program undertakes national surveillance of zoonotic diseases, targeted research projects with the aim of reducing infectious disease emergence, and manages Canada's national and international response to food- and water-borne disease outbreaks; and addresses the risk associated with rising global population mobility through enhancing evidence-based information. The Program works with federal, provincial, territorial, and regional stakeholders as well as international public health organizations to address emerging global food-borne, water-borne, environmental and zoonotic infectious diseases, in keeping with Canada's obligations under the International Health Regulations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
14,358,497 13,920,339 13,101,473

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
86 85 82
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Evidence of knowledge uptake of food safety surveillance information Percent of surveillance information uptake by stakeholders 90 March 31, 2015
Multi-jurisdictional food-borne and zoonotic illness outbreaks are detected and responded to in a timely manner Percent of significant multi-jurisdictional clusters that are assessed for further investigation within 24 hours of notification 90 March 31, 2015
Public access to information on Travel Health via social media Number of referrals from social media to the travel health section of the Web site 12,000 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • (Theme I: Addressing Climate Change and Air Quality)

    Reduce the risks associated with infectious diseases and public health threats related to climate change, as part of the Adaptation Theme of the Government's Clean Air Agenda through collaboration with federal, provincial and territorial as well as international stakeholders;

  • Provide Canadians and public health partners with current information and useful tools to prevent and control vector-borne zoonotic diseases; and
  • Strengthen coordination and capacity, including surge capacity, with continued vigilance in responding to multi-jurisdictional food-borne illness outbreaks.

Sub-Program 1.2.2: Conditions for Healthy Living

Description:

The Conditions for Healthy Living Program supports improved health outcomes for Canada's population throughout life by promoting positive mental, social, and physical development, and by enabling the development of healthy communities. Population-wide health promotion efforts that respond to the needs of vulnerable and at-risk populations have been shown to improve health outcomes, especially in circumstances where poor social, physical or economic living conditions exist. The Program contributes to early childhood development, sustains healthy living conditions into youth and adolescence and builds individual and community capacity to support healthy transitions into later life. In collaboration with provinces, territories, stakeholders, and individuals directly affected by a condition or disease, the Program advances priorities and initiatives to promote health and well-being. It also develops, tests, and implements evidence-based interventions and initiatives that can help those facing socially challenging circumstances (e.g., family violence, poor mental health, injuries, communicable infections, and social isolation). Finally, the Program provides exchanges evidence-based information for public health policies, practices and programs, and helps to build community public health capacity.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
196,100,516 191,169,388 190,548,904

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
356 329 329
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Programs, policies and practices to promote health and reduce health inequalities are informed by evidence. Level of usage of science and intervention research evidence in public health policies, practices, programs by key stakeholders 70 March 31, 2015
Communities have the capacity to respond to health inequalities of targeted populations. Percent of funded community organizations that leverage multisectoral collaborations to support at risk populations 70 March 31, 2015
Percent of funded community organizations that have leveraged funds from other sources 50 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Connect research and evidence to develop and strengthen public health programs and provide information, evidence and tools to organizations serving Canadians that promote good health and prevent disease, injury and family violence.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.2.1: Healthy Child Development

Description:

The Healthy Child Development Program promotes improvement of maternal and child health outcomes, and encourages positive health and development throughout the stages of infancy and childhood. Current research demonstrates that building resilience, developing empathy, exposing children to healthy eating practices and promoting breastfeeding can substantially compensate for adverse socio-economic conditions throughout their life. Through social science research, population health and community-based interventions, the Program works to promote positive physical, social and cognitive development, and reduce health inequalities in order to set a positive trajectory for sustained health throughout the life course. The Program engages key stakeholders to identify and address shared priorities related to healthy childhood and adolescent development, including fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, maternal and infant health, positive parenting practices, and health status in Aboriginal and Northern communities. It supports interventions to assist pregnant women, children, adolescents and families who face circumstances such as low socio-economic status, family violence, poor mental health, and isolation. As well, it facilitates knowledge development and exchange of practice guidelines, frameworks for action, training, tools and supports which benefit the Canadian population, their families, other jurisdictions, national non-governmental organizations, and public health practitioners. The Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern Communities, Canadian Prenatal Nutrition Program, Community Action Program for Children, Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD), and Joint Consortium for School Health.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
133,486,212 128,922,379 129,341,433

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
140 113 113
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Participation in PHAC funded interventions is positively associated with protective factors for healthy child development Percent change in school readiness for Aboriginal participants in funded interventions relative to an Aboriginal population of non-participants 15 March 31, 2018
Percent of participants reporting positive parental-child interaction in funded interventions relative to a population of non-participants with comparable socio-demographic characteristics 58.9 March 31, 2018

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Develop and strengthen enhanced engagement with P/Ts, other federal departments, NGOs and other key stakeholders across Canada to extend the impact of the Agency's programs, improving the health outcomes of vulnerable children and their parents;
  • Promote the health of vulnerable populations through the dissemination of effective approaches by providing web-based learning opportunities for health and frontline community-based practitioners, and enhancing the Canadian Best Practices Portal with content on maternal and infant health and aboriginal populations;
  • Advance early childhood development capacity in Northern Canada through accredited training at the Nunavut College for Early Childhood Educators and pilot innovative approaches in the delivery of the Aboriginal Head Start in Urban and Northern CommunitiesFootnote xxxii Program; and
  • Advance oral health promotion and prevention for at-risk children in community-based settings.

Sub-Sub-Program 1.2.2.2: Healthy Communities

Description:

The Healthy Communities Program aims to improve the community capacity to contribute to better health outcomes for Canada's population, including those who are vulnerable and at-risk. Evidence demonstrates that supportive social and physical community environments can have a positive impact on health status through the life course. Certain populations such as seniors, new Canadians, Aboriginal Peoples or those living with a communicable or infectious disease, are more likely to experience health challenges that can be prevented or mitigated in a community context. By engaging federal departments, other levels of government and stakeholders, the Program implements shared priorities and health promotion initiatives. The Program develops, adapts and implements promising, innovative population health and community-based initiatives and interventions that equip communities to support the population including those affected by a communicable disease in living the healthiest, most productive lives possible. The Program facilitates the exchange and uptake of evidence-based information to inform decision making for policy and programs and improve public health outcomes within communities. The Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Federal Initiative to Address HIV/AIDS, Innovation Strategy, Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative and Hepatitis C Prevention, Support and Research Program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
62,614,304 62,247,009 61,207,471

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
216 216 216
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Health promotion, policies and practices for supportive community environments are in place Number of provinces and territories participating in Age Friendly Communities 10 March 31, 2015
New Strategic Partnerships to promote health, prevent and control infections, and address barriers to care, treatment and support, are in place across Canada % of programming funded through Strategic Partnerships 50 March 31, 2018

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Support safe and healthy communities by preventing family violence through implementing the Family Violence Initiative Strategic Plan and modernizing an online resource centre for information on the prevention of violence and abuse within the family as a one-stop source for information to support Canadians and health professionals on violence and abuse within the family;
  • Strengthen the evidence base for effective mental health promotion and suicide prevention through developing tools and resources for health professionals and the development of a Federal Framework on Suicide Prevention; and
  • Enhance the capacity of stakeholders to contribute to the prevention and control of STBBIs (e.g., implement a holistic governance model that will include HIV, hepatitis C and related diseases and health factors, and developing a new fund on HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C Community Action).

Sub-Program 1.2.3: Chronic (non-communicable) Disease and Injury Prevention

Description:

The Chronic (non-communicable) Disease and Injury Prevention Program mobilizes and supports governmental and non-governmental organizations at national, provincial/territorial and local levels, and collaborates with international/national multi-sectoral stakeholders in designing, evaluating and identifying best practices, with the goal that policies and programs support healthy living, decrease chronic disease rates and reduce the impact of these diseases on Canada's population. This Program tracks injuries, chronic diseases, their risk factors and related inequalities, analyses the risks to public health, and determines priorities for action. It also identifies what works in chronic disease prevention and mitigation, according to scientific criteria, and disseminates these approaches widely to increase the use of effective interventions. Finally, it facilitates collaboration among stakeholders to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of chronic disease prevention and mitigation. The Program uses funding from the following transfer payments: Integrated Strategy for Healthy Living and Chronic Disease (Cancer, Diabetes, Cardiovascular Disease, Surveillance for Chronic Disease, Healthy Living, and Observatory of Best Practices), Canadian Breast Cancer Initiative, Federal Tobacco Control Strategy, and Promoting Access to Automated External Defibrillators in Recreational Hockey Arenas Initiative.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
57,165,538 55,807,205 53,707,205

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
186 200 200
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Chronic disease prevention priorities for Canada are identified and advanced Percent of key stakeholders who agree that chronic disease and injury priorities have been advanced through collaboration with PHAC 70 March 31, 2015
Chronic disease prevention practice, programs and policies for Canadians are informed by evidence Level of usage of evidence in chronic disease and injury policies and programs by key stakeholders 7 March 31, 2015
Percent of key stakeholders using best and promising practices / interventions to inform chronic disease and injury prevention practice 70 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Accelerate dissemination and access to surveillance data and analysis through Canada's Action Plan on Open Government and social media, enabling this information to be used to support public health action on healthy living, chronic diseases, and injuries, as well as maternal, infant and child health;
  • Continue to work with provinces and territories to implement a national surveillance system for autism spectrum disorders;
  • Support the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care to develop guidelines that support health care providers in delivering prevention-focused services; and
  • Improve governments' and stakeholders' understanding of neurological conditions (such as dementia) and their effects on the lives of Canadians by sharing the results of the National Population Health Study of Neurological ConditionsFootnote xxxiii.

Program 1.3 Health Security

Description:

The Health Security Program takes an all-hazards approach to the health security of Canada's population, which provides the Government of Canada with the ability to prepare for and respond to public health issues and events. This Program seeks to bolster the resiliency of the population and communities, thereby enhancing the ability to cope and respond. To accomplish this, its main methods of intervention include actions taken through partnerships with key jurisdictions and international partners. These actions are carried out through the implementation and maintenance of International Health Regulations and through the administration and enforcement of legislation, including the Emergency Management Act, the Quarantine Act, the Human Pathogens and Toxins Act, the Health of Animals Act, and the Human Pathogens Importation Regulations.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
55,329,126 55,329,126 54,896,463 47,908,379

Planned spending will decrease in 2016–17 primarily due to the sunsetting of a temporary initiative to support the Government of Canada's Provision of Essential Federal Services to the Toronto 2015 Pan American and Parapan American games.

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
243 243 220
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canada has the partnerships and regulatory frameworks to prevent, prepare for and respond to threats to public health Percent of partnerships with key jurisdictions and international partners in place to prepare for and respond to public health issues and events 100 March 31, 2015
Percent of Government of Canada's health emergency and regulatory programs implemented in accordance with the Emergency Management Act, the Quarantine Act, the Human Pathogens and Toxins Act and the Human Pathogens Importation Regulations 100 December 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

In addition to the expected results identified above, efforts under this Program will contribute to meeting the Agency's Organizational Priorities 1 and 3, as well as manage related risks 1, 2, 3, and 5 as described in the Risk Analysis sub-section.

As part of this Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Continue to develop the Agency's health security framework (vision, approach, and strategic objectives) on the prevention, preparedness, and response to all-hazards impacting the health of Canadians;
  • Enhance emergency management capacity to prepare, prevent, and respond to a range of health security threats including influenza pandemics by strengthening surge capacity across the Agency and through continued refinement of emergency response plans; and
  • Develop the Pan-Canadian Health Emergency Coordination Protocols, a comprehensive framework to provide for more consistent and inter-operational approaches to managing health emergencies at a pan-Canadian level, based on an all-hazard approach, as part of the commitment to the F/P/T Network on Emergency Preparedness and Response.

Sub-Program 1.3.1: Emergency Preparedness and Response

Description:

The Emergency Preparedness and Response Program is the central coordinating point among federal, provincial, territorial and non-governmental public health partners. The Program is also responsible for strengthening the nation's capacity to help prevent, mitigate, prepare and respond to public health emergencies. In order to meet these goals, the Program's interventions include emergency preparedness, emergency planning, training and exercises, ongoing situational awareness and risk assessment, maintenance of a Health Portfolio Operations Centre, coordination of inter-jurisdictional mutual aid, deployment of surge capacity to provinces and territories, and deployment of Microbiological Emergency Response Teams and associated mobile laboratories. The Program seeks to protect all persons living in Canada and provides surge capacity to provinces and territories and fulfills Canada's international obligations for events, such as infectious disease, pandemic influenza and bioterrorism. In addition, it coordinates response to national or man-made disasters and preparedness for mass gatherings and high profile events. The Program supports the continued implementation of the Emergency Management Act and International Health Regulations, and it also makes a significant contribution to the Beyond the Border (BTB) initiatives and to the North American Plan for Animal and Pandemic Influenza.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
38,876,207 38,797,176 34,548,259

Planned spending will decrease in 2016–17 primarily due to the sunsetting of a temporary initiative to support the Government of Canada's Provision of Essential Federal Services to the Toronto 2015 Pan American and Parapan American games.

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
146 146 145
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Canada has the capacity to prevent, mitigate, prepare and respond to public health emergencies including infectious disease Percent of all-hazards and disease specific plans and procedures developed, maintained and kept current at all times 100 March 31, 2015
Percent of inter-jurisdictional mutual aid/federal assistance requests coordinated for domestic and international response and resource sharing within negotiated timelines 100 March 31, 2015
Percent of required health portfolio capabilities ready to respond to events/ emergencies on 24/7 basis 100 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Revise the Health Portfolio Strategic Emergency Management Plan to further clarify roles and responsibilities and reflect recent changes within the Health Portfolio to enable a coordinated response during public health events;
  • Strengthen the 24/7 integrated situational awareness network that provides early alerts and warning to help Canada better prepare and respond to any eventualities of public health events by collaborating with key stakeholders and enhancing the systems for monitoring emerging public health situations of domestic and international concern;
  • Develop a sustainable approach to the acquisition of specialized pharmaceuticals and collaborate with partners to advance development and protect Canadians from high consequence of emerging disease threats; and
  • Oversee and coordinate the Health Portfolio's activities in support of the Government of Canada's Provision of Essential Federal Services to the Toronto 2015 Pan American Games.

Sub-Program 1.3.2: Border Health Security

Description:

The Border Health Program builds and maintains the health security of the Canadian population by implementing public health measures across borders. The Program includes communicable disease control and environmental health services activities to help maintain public health and provide information to international travellers. This Program administers and enforces the Quarantine Act and elements of the Department of Health Act, to reduce or delay the introduction of communicable diseases into or from Canada. The issuance of Ship Sanitation Certificates to international vessels, the implementation of passenger terminal and passenger transportation inspection programs (conveyances), and responding to passenger conveyance gastrointestinal disease outbreaks also help to prevent the introduction and spread of communicable diseases. The Border Health Security Program promotes coordinated border health measures by creating linkages between key border departments and agencies, including the Canadian Border Services Agency, Royal Canadian Mounted Police, and the Canadian Food Inspection Agency.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
5,655,957 5,655,957 2,818,409

Planned spending will decrease in 2016-17 primarily due to the sunsetting of the Travelling Public Program.

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
46 46 25
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Risks associated with import and export of communicable diseases into and out of Canada are mitigated and/or controlled Percent of inspected passenger conveyances (ships, planes, trains) that meet federal guidelines 75 March 31, 2015
Percent of designated Canadian point of entry that maintain the IHR core capacities 100 March 31, 2015

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15 in support of the ongoing administration of the Quarantine Act and the Department of Health Act:

  • Strengthen Canada's Quarantine Service Delivery Model through a more integrated approach with health and security partners, in order to enhance capacity to identify and address health security risks at borders;
  • Address public health risks on passenger conveyances by updating the Travelling Public Program's regulatory authority to reflect the latest scientific and industry standards; and
  • Continue to work with industry, public health partners, security authorities and Canadians so they have information to identify and address public health risks associated with travel.

Sub-Program 1.3.3: Biosecurity

Description:

The Biosecurity Program is responsible for administration and enforcement activities related to the use and manipulation of human, terrestrial animal pathogens, and toxins. This Program has specific responsibility under the Human Pathogens and Toxins Act and the Human Pathogens Importation Regulations, and select sections of the Health of Animals Act to promote and enforce safe and secure biosafety practices and laboratory environments. The Program's main methods of intervention include the issuance of import permits, laboratory inspections, lab certification and verification, education through the provision of knowledge products and training, and compliance and enforcement activities. Researchers, industries, hospitals and laboratories that handle pathogens and toxins are provided with regulatory oversight-including laboratory certification, inspection, guidance and the issue of importation permits. This Program further contributes to the health security of the population by mitigating risks posed by pathogen misuse such as a deliberate release or the intentional production of bioterrorism agents.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
10,796,962 10,443,330 10,541,711

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
51 51 51
Performance Measurement
Expected Results Performance Indicators Targets Date to be Achieved
Safe and secure biosafety practices and laboratory environments Percent of federally registered laboratories working with moderate risk pathogens and toxins compliant with requirements 90 December 31, 2015
Percent of federally registered laboratories working with high risk pathogens and toxins compliant with requirements 80 March 31, 2015
Percent decrease of laboratory acquired infections 0 December 31, 2021

Planning Highlights

As part of this Sub-Program, the Agency will undertake the following key activities and initiatives in 2014-15:

  • Develop and implement a comprehensive pathogen oversight regime to promote the safe and secure use of human pathogens and toxins in laboratories across Canada by tabling the proposed Human Pathogen and Toxins Regulations for parliamentary review and finalizing risk-based policy instruments;
  • Facilitate a competitive edge for Canadian businesses and the best, most innovative science at research institutions by streamlining service delivery to reduce burden on all regulated parties; and
  • Address challenges associated with rapid advances in life science research, such as synthetic biology, by strengthening a collaborative, interdepartmental, and foresight-based Canadian framework for pathogen oversight and accountability.

Internal Services

Description:

Internal Services are groups of related activities and resources that are administered to support the needs of programs and other corporate obligations of an organization. These groups are: Management and Oversight Services; Communications Services; Legal Services; Human Resources Management Services; Financial Management Services; Information Management Services; Information Technology Services; Real Property Services; Materiel Services; Acquisition Services; and Other Administrative Services. Internal Services include only those activities and resources that apply across an organization and not to those provided specifically to a program.

Budgetary Financial Resources (dollars)
2014–15
Main Estimates
2014–15
Planned Spending
2015–16
Planned Spending
2016–17
Planned Spending
90,520,268 90,520,268 90,067,773 89,709,613

The Government will continue to examine the level of resources required for priority initiatives and seek renewal as appropriate.

Human Resources (FTEs)
2014–15 2015–16 2016–17
616 612 606

Planning Highlights

Health Canada and the Agency continue to participate in a Shared Services Partnership. In this partnership, each organization retains responsibility for different internal services and corporate functions while working to deliver equitable services to both organizations (i.e., human resources, information management, information technology, real property, audit and evaluation, security, accounting, and procurement). Through this partnership, Health Canada and the Agency will continue to:

  • Harmonize policies and processes to provide open and transparent access and exchange of information on Health Canada and Agency programs, policies and regulations; and, to optimize technology to deliver consistent and cost-effective services for internal functions;
  • Implement government-wide modernization and transformative initiatives to support departmental business and programs, including:
    • Moving to a common e-mail platform and an upgraded desktop operating system in 2014;
    • Improving readiness to implement a Government of Canada records management system in 2015;
    • Moving from landline to wireless technologies, and standardizing and modernizing work stations to reflect evolving workplace and workforce needs;
    • Participating in a multi-departmental initiative (led by the Canada Border Services Agency) to implement a single window through which importers can electronically submit information necessary to comply with government import regulations; and
    • Implementing a competency-based performance management initiative to enhance the workforce and sustain a culture of high performance in support of core functions.

The Agency is a participant in the 2013-16 Federal Sustainable Development Strategy and contributes to the Theme IV (Greening Government Operations) targets through the Internal Services Program. The Agency plans to:

  • Achieve an industry-recognized level of high environmental performance in Government of Canada real property projects and operations;
  • Take action to embed environmental considerations into public procurement, in accordance with the federal Policy on Green Procurement;
  • Develop an approach to maintain or improve the sustainability of its workplace operations; and
  • Take further action to improve water management within its real property portfolio.

Additional details on the Agency's activities can be found in the Greening Government Operations Supplementary Information TableFootnote xxxiv.


Footnote 4
Level 3 involves the generation of information, products and tools that reflect models of best practices and standards that can be adopted or shared globally.
Footnote 5
This baseline is obtained through the Canadian Community Health Survey (2009-10). Over time, the objective is to achieve an upward trend for physical activity.
Footnote 6
This baseline is obtained through the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2009-2011). Over time, the objective is to achieve a downward trend for obesity and overweight.