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ARCHIVED - Canadian Integrated Surveillance Report:
Salmonella, Campylobacter, verotoxigenic E. coli and Shigella, from 2000 to 2004

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Supplement

December 2009 - Volume 35S3
PDF Version 50 pages - 1200 kb

[Table of Contents][Next]

Table of Contents

List of Figures

Figure 1: Rates of salmonellosis (per 100,000 population) as reported to the National Notifiable Disease Summary program (NDRS) and the National Enteric Surveillance Program (NESP) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004*

Figure 2: Reported rates of non-typhoid Salmonella cases (per 100,000 population), 1995 to 2004*

Figure 3: Reported rates of S. Typhimurium, S. Heidelberg, S. Thompson, S. Enteritidis and S. Hadar infections (per 100,000 population), 1995 to 2004*

Figure 4: Reported rates of S. Agona, S. Saintpaul, S. ssp I 4,[5],12:i:-, S. Newport and S. Infantis infections (per 100,000 population), 1995 to 2004*

Figure 5: Reported cases of non-typhoid Salmonella by month, 2000 to 2004, NDRS and NESP

Figure 6: Average reported rate of non-typhoid Salmonella cases (per 100,000 population per season*), by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NDRS

Figure 7: Reported rate of S. Typhimurium infections (per 100,000 population) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Figure 8: Reported rate of S. Enteritidis infections (per 100,000 population) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Figure 9: Reported rate of S. Heidelberg infections (per 100,000 population) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Figure 10: Reported rate of S. Hadar infections (per 100,000 population) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Figure 11: Reported rate of Salmonella cases and hospitalizations (per 100,000 population) by age group, 2000 to 2004 combined, NDRS and CIHI

Figure 12: Reported rates of S. Typhi cases (per 100,000 population), 1995 to 2004*

Figure 13: Reported cases of S. Typhi by month, 2000 to 2004, NDRS and NESP

Figure 14: Reported rate of S. Typhi infections (per 100,000 population) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Figure 15: Reported rate of S. Paratyphi infections (per 100,000 population) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Figure 16: Proportion of the top S. Typhimurium phage types from human isolates, 2000 to 2004, NML

Figure 17: Proportion of the top S. Enteritidis phage types from human isolates, 2000 to 2004, NML

Figure 18: Proportion of the top S. Heidelberg phage types from human isolates, 2000 to 2004, NML

Figure 19: Proportion of the top S. Hadar phage types from human isolates, 2000 to 2004, NML

Figure 20: S. Typhimurium isolates from non-human sources, 2000 to 2004

Figure 21: S. Hadar isolates from non-human sources, 2000 to 2004

Figure 22: S. Heidelberg isolates from non-human sources, 2000 to 2004

Figure 23: S. Enteritidis isolates from non-human sources, 2000 to 2004

Figure 24: Rates of campylobacteriosis (per 100,000 population) as reported to the National Notifiable Disease Summary program (NDRS) and the National Enteric Surveillance Program (NESP) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004

Figure 25: Rates of Campylobacter cases (per 100,000 population), 1995 to 2004, NDRS and NESP

Figure 26: Reported cases of Campylobacter by month, 2000 to 2004, NDRS

Figure 27: Average reported rate of Campylobacter cases (per 100,000 population per season*) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NDRS

Figure 28: Reported rate of Campylobacter cases (per 100,000 population) by age group, 2000 to 2004 combined, NDRS

Figure 29: Rates of verotoxigenic E. coli infections (per 100,000 population) as reported to the National Notifiable Disease Summary program (NDRS) and the National Enteric Surveillance Program (NESP) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004*

Figure 30: Reported rates of verotoxigenic E. coli infections (per 100,000 population), 1995 to 2004, NDRS and NML/NESP*

Figure 31: Reported cases of verotoxigenic E. coli by month, 2000 to 2004, NDRS and NESP

Figure 32: Average reported rate of verotoxigenic E. coli infections (per 100,000 population per season*) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NDRS

Figure 33: Reported rate of verotoxigenic E. coli infections and hospitalizations (per 100,000 population) by age group, 2000 to 2004 combined, NDRS and CIHI

Figure 34: Rates of shigellosis (per 100,000 population) as reported to the National Notifiable Disease Summary program (NDRS) and the National Enteric Surveillance Program (NESP) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004

Figure 35: Reported rate of Shigella cases (per 100,000 population), 1995 to 2004, NDRS and NML/NESP

Figure 36: Reported cases of Shigella by month, 2000 to 2004, NDRS and NESP

Figure 37: Average reported rate of Shigella infections (per 100,000 population per season*) by province/territory, 2000 to 2004, NDRS

Figure 38: Reported rate of Shigella cases and hospitalizations (per 100,000 population) by age group, 2000 to 2004 combined, NDRS and CIHI

List of Tables

Table 1: Number of Salmonella cases in Canada by year and surveillance system

Table 2: Top 10 Salmonella serovars (number) from human cases, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 3: Salmonella serovars showing an increase in reporting frequency, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 4: Number of Salmonella-related outbreaks and case clusters (and associated laboratoryconfirmed cases reported) by serovar, 2000 to 2004, NML, NESP, and PulseNet Canada

Table 5: Salmonella-related outbreaks and case clusters (number of related cases) by exposure settings, 2000 to 2004, NML, NESP and PulseNet Canada

Table 6: Number of travel-acquired non-typhoid Salmonella infections and associated region/ continent/country, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 7: Cases of S. Paratyphi and S. Typhi, 2000 to 2004, NESP and NDRS

Table 8: Number of travel-acquired S. Paratyphi and S. Typhi infections and associated continents, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 9: Prevalence of resistance to one or more of the 16 antimicrobials tested, 2003 and 2004, CIPARS

Table 10: Number of human isolates in the top four Salmonella serovars that were phage typed, 2000 to 2004, NML*

Table 11: Number of non-human Salmonella isolates by province, 2000 to 2004, LFZ*

Table 12: Top 10 Salmonella serovars (number) isolated from non-human sources reported, by source, 2000 to 2004 combined, LFZ*

Table 13: Salmonella serovars from non-human sources, by source, 2000 to 2004, LFZ

Table 14: Salmonella serovars isolated from companion animals, 2000 to 2004, LFZ

Table 15: Number of campylobacteriosis cases in Canada by year and surveillance system

Table 16: Campylobacter species (number), 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 17: Campylobacter-related outbreaks and case clusters (number of related cases) by exposure settings, 2000 to 2004, NML, NESP and PulseNet Canada

Table 18: Number of travel-acquired Campylobacter infections by associated region/continent/country, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 19: Number of verotoxigenic E. coli cases in Canada by year and surveillance system

Table 20: Number of verotoxigenic E. coli cases by serotype, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 21: Verotoxigenic E. coli-related outbreaks and case clusters (number of related cases) by exposure settings, 2000 to 2004, NML, NESP and PulseNet Canada

Table 22: Number of travel-acquired verotoxigenic E. coli infections by associated region/continent/ country, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 23: Number of Shigella cases in Canada by year and surveillance system

Table 24: Shigella species (number of cases), 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 25: Shigella flexneri serotypes (number of cases), 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 26: Shigella-related outbreaks and case clusters (number of related cases reported) by exposure settings, 2000 to 2004, NML, NESP and PulseNet Canada

Table 27: Number of travel-acquired Shigella infections by associated region/continent/country, 2000 to 2004, NESP

Table 28: Hospitalization data by pathogen, 2000 to 2004, CIHI, NND

Table 29: Deaths associated with enteric infections, 2000 to 2004, CIHI and Vital Statistics (Statistics Canada)

Table 30: Number of isolates collected from unusual isolation sites (i.e. non-faecal), by pathogen, 2000 to 2004, NESP



Acknowledgments

This document would not have been possible without the dedication and hard work of many medical, public health, and scientific personnel from across Canada. Local inspectors, public and private health care workers and public and private laboratory personnel collected the initial samples and data. Provincial, territorial and federal personnel ensured that the samples and data were managed appropriately to be included in the national databases. The authors would like to especially thank the personnel from the Enteric Diseases Program, National Microbiology Laboratory, Winnipeg, the Laboratory for Foodborne Zoonoses, Guelph, the Centre for Foodborne, Environmental and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases and the Canadian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance for the valuable input provided in compiling this report.

Program Coordinators

  • Kathryn Doré
  • Paul Sockett
  • Frank Pollari
  • Lai King Ng

Authors and Analysts

  • Nadia Ciampa
  • Rita Finley
  • Manon D Fleury
  • James Flint
  • Andrea Nesbitt
  • Regan Murray
  • Marielle Pauzé

Executive Summary

This is the second integrated surveillance report looking at temporal and spatial trends of selected enteric diseases in Canada from various data sources. This report focuses on the years 2000 to 2004. The pathogens described are Salmonella, Campylobacter, verotoxigenic Escherichia coli and Shigella. From 2000 to 2004, a general decline in reported rates of all four pathogens was observed in all except a few provinces. When looking at more long-term trends from 1995 to 2004, a similar decline was seen in nationally reported rates for all four pathogens. S. Typhimurium was the most frequently reported Salmonella serovar during the five-year period described, followed by S. Heidelberg and S. Enteritidis. C. jejuni remained the most prevalent Campylobacter species reported between 2000 and 2004. E. coli O157 comprised the majority of verotoxigenic E.coli isolates over these five years. Shigella sonnei was the most frequently reported Shigella species.

Hospitalizations, deaths, outbreaks and case clusters, as well as unusual isolation sites and travel-acquired infections are also explored in this report. Pathogenic E. coli was associated with the highest hospitalization rates over the five-year period, although Salmonella infections resulted in the largest number of deaths overall. Data on outbreaks and case clusters is limited to those reported to the National Enteric Surveillance Program (NESP) and the National Microbiology Laboratory (NML). Salmonella-related outbreaks and case clusters comprised the largest proportion of reported outbreaks and case clusters as well as the largest number of outbreak-related cases over the five-year period. Although travel history is largely under-reported, Salmonella infections accounted for the largest proportion of reported travel-acquired illnesses. Salmonella also accounted for the majority of reported isolations from non-faecal sample sources.