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ARCHIVED - Family Violence Prevention Resources - Aboriginal

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Reports & Articles

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Aboriginal Children With and Without Developmental Delay: Characteristics of MaltreatmentExternal Link
by Rose Mandamin-Cameron and Ann Fudge Schormans

This document describes the forms and features of child maltreatment experienced by Aboriginal children, with and without developmental delay, reported to Canadian child protection services, through an examination of data from the 2001 Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS). Additionally, it explores the characteristics of the alleged perpetrator(s), the child her/himself, the child's caregiver, and the relevant socio-economic characteristics pertinent to the child's living situation at the time of reporting. 2007, 20 p.

Aboriginal Domestic Violence in Canada (PDF document)External Link
by Michael Bopp, Judie Bopp, Phil Lane, Jr., Four Worlds Centre for Development Learning. Prepared for Aboriginal Healing Foundation

This report explores the issue of Aboriginal domestic violence in Canada. Topics reviewed include the context in which abuse occurs in Aboriginal families, the common models and theories concerning family violence, and the responses to Aboriginal family violence. Based on challenges of current approaches, a framework is presented with the aim of reducing and eliminating the occurrence of Aboriginal family violence. 2003, 135 p. (Available in French (PDF document)External Link.)

Aboriginal Women and Family Violence

Aboriginal Women and Family Violence
by the Public Health Agency of Canada

This report is a condensed version of a research report, prepared by the Ipsos-Reid research firm for Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, on the attitudes and opinions of Aboriginal women, and the professionals who work with them, on intimate partner violence against women. It includes a discussion of the causes and consequences of male violence against women in Aboriginal communities, and of sources of support, resource gaps and recommendations. The report is intended, primarily, for organizations providing assistance to Aboriginal women who have experienced violence. 2008, 39 p. HP20-10-2008E

Creating a Framework for the Wisdom of the CommunityExternal Link Mary Beth Levan; prepared for the Department of Justice Canada

This document stems from consultations with service providers in the northern territories on best practices, challenges, and gaps in supports for crime victims and makes recommendations to address the issues raised. 2004, 228 p.

Ending Violence in Aboriginal Communities: Best Practices in Aboriginal Shelters and Communities (PDF document)External Link
National Aboriginal Circle Against Family Violence (NACAFV)

This report is the result of a study to develop best practices in dealing with family violence in Aboriginal communities. Best practices were identified through consultations with shelters for Aboriginal women and community organizations across Canada. Barriers and challenges to shelters’ success are also listed, along with general observations concerning what works and what doesn't. 2006, 50 p. (Available in French (PDF document)External Link)

The Intersection of Race, Disability and Child Maltreatment: Aboriginal Children With Developmental Disabilities and the Child Welfare SystemExternal Link
by Ann Fudge Schormans and Rose Mandamin-Cameron, Journal on Developmental Disabilities – Volume 13, Number 1

This paper presents a preliminary description of the typologies and features of child maltreatment experienced by Aboriginal children, with and without developmental delay, reported to Canadian child protection services. 2007, 20 p.

Understanding Family Violence and Sexual Assault in the Territories, First Nations, Inuit and Métis PeoplesExternal Link
by Anna Paulette. Prepared for Department of Justice Canada

Following the discussion of the methodology for the research conducted, the report begins with the data of the demographic characteristics of those accused of a sexual assault or family violence offence in the territories. It then follows the incidents through the criminal justice process. The final sections provide an analysis of the link between the offences and offenders’ history of abuse. 2008, 55 p. (Available in FrenchExternal Link)

Understanding the Overrepresentation of First Nations children in Canada's child welfare system: An analsysis of the Canadian Incidence Study of Reported Child Abuse and Neglect (CIS-2003)External Link
by Nico Trocmé, Bruce MacLaurin, Barb Fallon, Della Knoke, Lisa Pitman, & Megan McCormack, Centre of Excellence for Child Welfare (CECW)

This report compares children of First Nations heritage with non-Aboriginal children included in the CIS-2003 in an effort to better understand some of the factors contributing to the over-representation of First Nations children in the child welfare system in Canada, and specifically in out-of-home care. 2005, 80 p.

Victimization and offending among the Aboriginal population in CanadaExternal Link
by Jodi-Anne Brzozowski, Andrea Taylor-Butts and Sara Johnson, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada

Using data from victimization, police and corrections surveys, this report explores the involvement of Aboriginal peoples in the criminal justice system. It also examines particular factors which could be related to the high levels of representation in the criminal justice system. Information on Aboriginal peoples fear of crime and their perceptions of the justice system as well as their experiences with discrimination are presented, along with a description of some of the programs and services that have been developed as a response to the specialized needs of Aboriginal people in the criminal justice system. June 2006, 31 p.

Victimization and Offending in Canada’s Territories, 2004-2005External Link
by Jodi-Anne Brzozowski, Andrea Taylor-Butts and Sara Johnson, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada

Using recent police-reported and self-reported data, this report provides a comprehensive profile of the nature and extent of crime in Canada’s northern territories. The report also examines particular factors that seem to be associated with higher rates of victimization and offending. 2006, 23 p.

Violent Victimization of Aboriginal People in Canadian Provinces, 2009External Link
by Samuel Perreault, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada

This article presents information from the 2009 GSS on criminal victimizations as reported by Aboriginals living in the provinces and the associated behaviours. 2011, 35 p.

Violent Victimization of Aboriginal Women in the Canadian Provinces, 2009External Link
by Shannon Brennan, Canadian Centre for Justice Statistics, Statistics Canada

This report examines the prevalence and nature of self-reported violence against Aboriginal women and that which is reported to police. 2011, 21 p.

Voices of Our Sisters In Spirit: A Report to Families and Communities 2nd Edition (PDF document)External Link
Native Women's Association of Canada (NWAC)

The report summarizes information gained through interviews with participating families about their missing or murdered Aboriginal women and girls lost to violence. It also includes information about tool kits developed by NWAC for use by community members, individuals and organizations to raise awareness about violence against Aboriginal women and girls and to provide specific direction and assistance for those who have lost a family member to violence. March 2009, 109 p.

What Their Stories Tell Us: Research Findings from the Sisters in Spirit Initiative (PDF document)External Link
by the Native Women's Association of Canada NWAC

This report brings together five years of research on missing and murdered Aboriginal women and girls in Canada. It examines root causes of violence against Aboriginal women, provides information on the number of Aboriginal women and girls who have gone missing or who have been murdered in Canada, and identifies some of the ways forward. 2010. 58 p.

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