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National Child Day

Child and Youth Corner

As a child under the age of 18, you have the right:

  1. To be protected – from abuse, neglect and exploitation
  2. To basic care – such as having food and shelter
  3. To be heard – and to participate in decisions that affect you
  4. To know your rights!

Knowing your rights is powerful and can help you to create the changes you want to see! As a young person under the age of 18 you have special rights, and these rights are protected by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

What is the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child?

In 1989, the United Nations adopted the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The Convention has been agreed to by almost every country in the world. The Convention says that governments are in charge of making sure that children have rights and that those rights are respected.

To learn more:

What does the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child mean for young people in Canada?

In the Convention, there is a full list of rights for all children under the age of 18. The Convention says that these rights should be met for you to grow up to reach your full potential and to give you the best start in life. This means that all children and young people under the age of 18 are to be treated with dignity and respect, protected from harm, given a voice in issues of concern to them and provided with basic needs such as food and shelter.

Canada agreed to the Convention in 1991 and has been working ever since to ensure that all children and young people know about and live their rights.

Example of the Right to Health: An Infographic (Developed by youth via The Students Commission of Canada)

The National Child  Day Facts Right to Health: United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) Article # 24. All young people have the right to be healthy and protected from harm.

In Canada we've made a conscious effort to protect children from tobacco consumption and marketing.

In 1990 15.5% of grade 10 students reported smoking daily. In 2010 6.5% of grade 10 students reported smoking daily. That's a 58% drop for grade 10 students.

The National Child Day Facts – Infographic (PDF Document - 1 page, 2.31 MB)

What is National Child Day?

The rights of children and youth in Canada are celebrated each year on November 20th. Take part by spreading the word to your friends, family and community.

You can make a difference!

By recognizing and asserting your rights, you can make a difference. Take the time to get to know your rights, and make your voice heard!

How to get involved:

Social media messages developed by youth via The Students Commission of Canada
  • Get educated. Learn about children's rights. #UNCRC
  • Get involved in children's rights. You can make a difference. #Youth
  • National Child Day is almost here! Nov. 20th. Spread the word.
  • All children and youth have rights. #GetThemInformed. #Adults
  • Celebrate National Child Day, share one right young people have. #Childcare
  • Did you know, children have the right to... #Learn
  • Do your kids know their rights? #HelpThemLearn. #Childrights
  • Get informed about the UNCRC. Spread the word. #MakeAChange. #UNCRC
  • Learn more about National Child Day through the Public Health Agency. #Learn #PHAC
  • How are you going to celebrate National Child Day? Make a change. #BeTheDifference. #Children'sRights
  • All children have the right to have their voice heard. #TakeItSeriously. #MakeADifference. #KnowYourRights.
  • All Children have the right to be themselves. #GetThem Informed. #KnowYourRights
  • All children have the right to be protected. #KeepThem Safe. #SpreadTheWord
  • Adults should do what is best for children. #Know your Rights. #Get Involved. #Children'sRights
  • All children have the right to an education. #Get Involved. #MakeADifference. #KnowYourRights
  • No child should be exploited. #GetThemInformed. #SpreadTheWord. #KnowYourRights