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Clonorchis sinensis - Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)

MATERIAL SAFETY DATA SHEET - INFECTIOUS SUBSTANCES

SECTION I - INFECTIOUS AGENT

NAME: Clonorchis sinensis

SYNONYM OR CROSS REFERENCE: Clonorchiasis, Chinese or oriental liver fluke disease

CHARACTERISTICS: Helminth, Trematode, adult worms are 10-25 mm long and 3-5 mm wide; eggs are 20-30 µm long and 15-17 µm wide

SECTION II - HEALTH HAZARD

PATHOGENICITY: Symptoms are mostly mild and includes loss of appetite, nausea, diarrhea and the sensation of abdominal pressure or pain; rarely, bile duct obstruction may produce jaundice followed by cirrhosis, enlargement and tenderness of the liver, progressive ascites and edema; cholangitis, chloelithiasis, and pancreatitis may develop from chronic infection; a significant risk factor for the development of cholangiocarcinoma

EPIDEMIOLOGY: Endemic in South East China, but present in the rest of the country; occurs in Japan, Taiwan, Korea, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam; highest prevalence among those over the age of 40; cases are commonly documented in North America, mainly imported by Asian immigrants

HOST RANGE: Humans, cats, dogs, swine, fish

INFECTIOUS DOSE: Not known

MODE OF TRANSMISSION: Ingestion of raw or improperly cooked freshwater fish or crayfish containing encysted larvae

INCUBATION PERIOD: Variable; depends on the number of worms present; flukes may reach maturity within 1 month after encysted larvae ingested

COMMUNICABILITY: Not directly transmitted from person-to-person; infected individuals may pass viable eggs up to 30 years

SECTION III - DISSEMINATION

RESERVOIR: Humans, cats, dogs, rats, swine

ZOONOSIS: Yes - domestic animals act as definitive hosts

VECTORS: Snails

SECTION IV - VIABILITY

DRUG SUSCEPTIBILITY: Sensitive to praziquantel and albendazole

SUSCEPTIBILITY TO DISINFECTANTS: All infective stages are susceptible to 1% sodium hypochlorite

PHYSICAL INACTIVATION: Sensitive to heating at 56°C for 30 minutes for all infectious stages

SURVIVAL OUTSIDE HOST: Sensitive to freezing

SECTION V - MEDICAL

SURVEILLANCE: Monitor for symptoms; confirm by microscopic demonstration of larvae in feces

FIRST AID/TREATMENT: Administer appropriate drug therapy; surgery for rare severe biliary obstruction

IMMUNIZATION: None available

PROPHYLAXIS: None available

SECTION VI - LABORATORY HAZARDS

LABORATORY-ACQUIRED INFECTIONS: None reported to date

SOURCES/SPECIMENS: Feces

PRIMARY HAZARDS: Ingestion of infective-eggs; skin penetration of infective larvae

SPECIAL HAZARDS: Animals infected with parasites pose a potential hazard to laboratory personnel

SECTION VII - RECOMMENDED PRECAUTIONS

CONTAINMENT REQUIREMENTS: Biosafety level 2 practices and containment equipment for all activities involving infective stages of the parasite and potentially infectious body fluids or tissues

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING: Laboratory coat; gloves when skin contact with infectious materials is unavoidable

OTHER PRECAUTIONS: None

SECTION VIII - HANDLING INFORMATION

SPILLS: Allow aerosols to settle; wearing protective clothing cover the spill with absorbent paper towel and apply 1% sodium hypochlorite starting at the perimeter and working towards the center; allow sufficient contact time (30 min) before clean up

DISPOSAL: Decontaminate all wastes before disposal; steam sterilization, chemical disinfection, incineration

STORAGE: In sealed containers that are appropriately labelled

SECTION IX - MISCELLANEOUS INFORMATION

Date prepared: January 2000

Prepared by: Office of Laboratory Security, PHAC

Although the information, opinions and recommendations contained in this Material Safety Data Sheet are compiled from sources believed to be reliable, we accept no responsibility for the accuracy, sufficiency, or reliability or for any loss or injury resulting from the use of the information. Newly discovered hazards are frequent and this information may not be completely up to date.

Copyright ©
Health Canada, 2001