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ARCHIVED - Healthy Pregnancy

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Common Questions about Smoking and Pregnancy

I only smoke a few cigarettes a day. Should I still quit?

Yes. All tobacco smoke is bad for both you and your baby. The sooner you quit completely, the better.

Don't some mothers who smoke while they're pregnant still have healthy babies?

Yes, but they're lucky. Smoking during pregnancy is a gamble that puts your child at risk.

Will I gain extra weight if I quit now?

It is possible that if you stop smoking you may eat more to replace your oral habit. Chewing sugar-free gum might help. If you do gain a few pounds, don't worry. Being physically active and making healthy food choices will help you lose the extra weight after your baby is born. You'll also feel great knowing you gave your baby the best possible start in life.

Is it okay for me to smoke after the baby is born?

The best choice for you and your baby is to stay smoke-free. If you start smoking again, you are putting your baby at risk from the harmful effects of second-hand smoke and your own health at risk from the effects of smoking. By staying smoke-free you're protecting both you and your baby from the harmful effects of tobacco smoke.

What can I do to help me quit?

Some people find that picking a quit day helps. On that day, you throw away your cigarettes, lighters, matches and ashtrays. In anticipation of the quit day, you can reduce the number of cigarettes you smoke per day. Set a limit and stick to it. When you feel the urge to smoke, try chewing gum, eating a piece of fruit, calling a friend or going for a walk. Stop-smoking support groups may also help.