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Disclosure of Founded Cases of Wrongdoing

The Public Health Agency of Canada is committed to strengthening the integrity of the federal public service by fostering an environment in which employees may disclose possible wrongdoing, and be protected from reprisal for having made such a disclosure.

The goal of the Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act (PSDPA), which came into force on April 15, 2007, is not only to provide direction as to what constitutes wrongdoing in a federal government organization but also to encourage public servants to come forward if they have reason to believe that serious wrongdoing has taken place. When wrongdoing is reported to a manager or to the department's Internal Disclosure Office, an investigation takes place.

Under the PSDPA, wrongdoing is defined as a contravention of any law, the misuse of public funds or a public asset, gross mismanagement in the public sector, a serious breach of a code of conduct, an act or omission that creates a substantial and specific danger to the life, health or safety of persons, or to the environment, and knowingly directing or counselling a person to commit wrongdoing.

The PSDPA protects those making a disclosure against reprisal and provides a fair and objective process for those accused of wrongdoing.

When a disclosure of wrongdoing is deemed founded by departmental officials, public access is provided to information regarding the wrongdoing. This information must contain: a description of the wrongdoing; recommendations in relation to the wrongdoing; and corrective action taken in relation to the finding of wrongdoing or the reason why no corrective action was taken. Names of persons involved are only to be disclosed if necessary to adequately describe the wrongdoing.

The Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada Web site contains more information on the Public Servants Disclosure Protection ActExternal site.

The cases described below are being proactively disclosed by the Public Health Agency of Canada.